Before and After HDR photo and PHOTIGY news

Inside Sir Francis Drake Hotel, San Fransisco:

Visit our “Technically Advanced Photography” Project WWW.PHOTIGY.COM to view photos, find tutorials, and read industry updates:

BTS of Sephora assignment: how to shoot glossy subjects
 Product photography tutorial – BTS: working with glossy subjects. Continue reading: BTS of Sephora assignment: how to shoot glossy subjects
 Industry News & Deals #1
 Daily deals, arrivals and photography industry updates. Continue reading: Industry News & Deals #1
How the image was created: a Dremel Tool shot
Behind the scene: shooting a dremel tool. Continue reading: How the image was created: a Dremel Tool shot
Studio Photography Insights: Hand Tool shot
Latest Weekly assignment results, video and more. Continue reading: Studio Photography Insights: Hand Tool shot
Food Photography Tutorial, Part one
Food Photography tutorial and bonus: BTS of the macro food shot (premium content)Continue reading: Food Photography Tutorial, Part one
Weekly photography digest #3

HDR in example. How I processed this picture.

These are the images before and after post-production. Below I’ll show how I did it step by step. I use a different workflow for every HDR photo, and this is one of them. All manipulations with this image are non destructive. You can go back to any step and change all parameters.

The source (middle image) is a good quality photo and I can accomplish this quality only by converting it in Adobe Camera RAW. There are no underexposure and overexposure parts, and I can create nice looking image for the web. But I prefer to create more dramatic, more bold, and more detailed image. To do this, I assemble 3 images in Photomatix Pro.

 

Continue reading HDR in example. How I processed this picture.

HDR without a tripod: Photoshop vs Photoshop+Photomatix Pro 4 vs Photomatix Pro 4

I was challenged by interesting question from Google+ discussion: what post processing is preferred if you are shooting a multiple exposure HDR without a tripod. I’ve tested 3 methods:

1. Align and Merge to HDR image in Photoshop

2. Stack and align bracketed exposures in Photoshop and then assemble HDR image in Photomatix Pro 4

3. Align and process HDR in Photomatix Pro 4


All 3 ways have advantages and disadvantages. I’ll show you 100% fragments, and you will make your own decision on what is the best and where.
My preference will depend from time I have for processing each image. For perfect result, I think, we need to combine all 3 methods and using masking in Photoshop to use only the best parts from each image. The fastest way for creating handheld HDR is Photomatix Pro 4, but we will get little bit blurred image with lost some details.

I found that the optimum method for me is to use Photoshop for aligning only and process HDR file in Photomatix Pro 4. Alternatively, Photomatix plugin for Photoshop can be used, I believe it gives the same result.

Now, the test results:

This is the test image without any post HDR ajustments and corrections with saved as much details as possible:

Test HDR image

Test HDR image

Continue reading HDR without a tripod: Photoshop vs Photoshop+Photomatix Pro 4 vs Photomatix Pro 4

High Dynamic Range images. HDRi before and after. Landscapes.











I like this type of articles a lot: before and after images.  Now I show you some outstanding HDR images we had done in a past. Do not do them much now, busy with in-studio work with the products, but I still enjoy working with HDRi.
I will not give you many technical aspects how to make HDR photos, but this is what our photographer Alex Koloskov has told me about how he shot these landscape HDR photos:

” I usually do from two to  four or five exposures for each HDR, decision s made based on how wide dynamic range is  needed.

For bright sunny day, where there is a deep shadows  and bright sky or water is present, up to five exposures may be needed to get the correct exposure for the whole range of brightness. On dusk and dawn, two or three exposure will be enough.

I rarely use auto exposure bracketing (when camera makes from 3 to 5 images for you form up to _3 to +3 f-stops), but rather shoot on manual, making more then 3 f-stops bracketing when needed.

The idea is to get correctly exposed the darkest and the brightest part of the image , the rest should fall in between.”

~Alex

For these landscape images I used Photomatix Pro 3 because I like some unrealistic effect it gives.
When I need more realistic images (especially for architecture) I like to use Photoshop,  selecting two or more files from a set of exposures to merge and create a High Dynamic Range image. There is even more accurate method: using masks, when I manually merge specific areas of the image by masking them and blending with another layer.

But again, for  these particular photos I used Photomatix Pro 3 plus some Photoshop adjustments.

Mouse Over to see Before and After

HDR photography before and after, Atlanta, GA

HDR photography before and after, Atlanta, GA

Continue reading High Dynamic Range images. HDRi before and after. Landscapes.

New stock images of Night Atlanta, GA

You can buy all this images in High Resolution on our stock photos web sites:

Night Atlanta, GA stock images

Night Atlanta, GA stock images

Continue reading New stock images of Night Atlanta, GA

Not HDR. Before and after photos.

It is not real HDR images. It’s an advantage to shoot RAW.

What is the difference between JPEG and RAW formats? The main advantage of JPEG format is that images in JPEG are ready for print or can be uploaded to the web as soon as you take them off your camera.
If you choose to use RAW format, you can have a lot of fun manipulating your image.  I promise :-). You may not know it, but camera RAW format is 12, 14 or even 16 bits per color (depending on your sensor), compared to 8 bits per color for a JPEG. What does that mean?  RAW gives significantly more room for adjustments, as it has more color information (this is a raw snapshot from a camera’s sensor), allowing more brightness, contrast, white balance, and saturation, without losing quality.   The final image will be converted (down-sampled) to 8 bits per color, because our monitors only support 8 bits per color anyway. Working with JPEG is like manipulating on a small web-size photo, compared to a full-resolution source and saving it to a small size afterward.

AA099313
Continue reading Not HDR. Before and after photos.

Callaway Gardens HDR images (before and after)

Callaway Gardens HDR photos

Callaway Gardens, Georgia

Piedmont Park, Atlanta, HDR photogrpahy

Piedmont Park, Atlanta, HDR image

HDR photogrpahy

I hope you see where is before and after:-)